CDSA

Why America’s Current Approach to Cybersecurity is Dangerous (Slate)

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It’s almost impossible these days to avoid media coverage of Russia’s role in hacking the 2016 election. So it was in 2015, when news broke that Chinese hackers had breached the U.S. Office of Personnel Management. Likewise for big cyberattacks the year in 2014 (Sony PicturesHome Depot) and the year before that (Target). For the public, it’s usually these kinds of incidents that come to mind when they hear the term “cybersecurity.” They are complex and costly, and cast doubt on the trustworthiness of our major institutions—from government to banks to the electric grid.

Yet multiple surveys show that Americans tend to ignore even the most basic security measures with their own digital devices.

How to account for our public interest but our personal … well … meh? We should be concerned that, as a society, our minds go mushy when it comes to “digital literacy,” “information security,” “online safety,” or whichever name we choose. In fact, that mushiness is a major reason why America’s current approach to cybersecurity is so dangerous. We’re ignoring the behaviors of the overwhelming majority of actual users, and therefore leaving the largest attack surface undefended.